the t-rex commentary

Jul 24

slaughterhouse90210:

“The pictures do not lie, but neither do they tell the whole story. They are merely a record of time passing, the outward evidence.” 
― Paul Auster, Travels in the Scriptorium

slaughterhouse90210:

“The pictures do not lie, but neither do they tell the whole story. They are merely a record of time passing, the outward evidence.”
― Paul Auster, Travels in the Scriptorium

Jul 23

The protagonists of post-Enlightenment relativism and perspectivism claim that if the Enlightenment conceptions of truth and rationality cannot be sustained, theirs is the only possible alternative.

Post-Enlightenment relativism and perspectivism are thus the negative counterpart of the Enlightenment, its inverted mirror-image. Where the Enlightenment invoked the arguments of Kant or Bentham, such post-Enlightenment theorists invoke Nietzsche’s attacks upon Kant and Bentham. It is therefore not surprising that what was invisible to the thinkers of the Enlightenment should be equally invisible to those post-modernist relativists and perspectivists who take themselves to be the enemies of the Enlightenment, while in fact being to a large and unacknowledged degree its heirs.

” — Alasdair MacIntyre, Whose Justice? Which Rationality?

(Source: ayjay)

Jul 22

kohenari:

Spoiler alert!
Via the Explore blog:

For your daily dose of dystopia, a visual guide to Shakespeare’s tragedies, where everybody dies, by Caitlin Griffin. Best thing since those pictogram-infographic summaries of famous lives. 
Also see Star Wars reimagined as a Shakespearean tragedy. 
(↬ Coudal)

kohenari:

Spoiler alert!

Via the Explore blog:

For your daily dose of dystopia, a visual guide to Shakespeare’s tragedies, where everybody dies, by Caitlin Griffin. Best thing since those pictogram-infographic summaries of famous lives

Also see Star Wars reimagined as a Shakespearean tragedy

( Coudal)

Jul 21

“I don’t understand how people can talk about “free trade” with a straight face. Apart from the transparent violations of free trade built into the World Trade Organization rules-monopolistic pricing guarantees that go far beyond anything in economic history, for example-what does it mean for political entities that rely crucially on the dynamic state sector for economic development (like the US) to enter into “free trade agreements”?” — Noam Chomsky

(Source: chomsky.info, via noam-chomsky)

Jul 20

“The important exception is ovulating females, who are above the mean, or warm, in the early morning. People use this fact, called the rhythm method, as a form of birth control. The medical term for these people is ‘parents.’” — Mark Crislip
Mark Crislip - Puswhisperer: A Year in the Life of an Infectious Disease Doc 1.3Puswhisperer: A Year in the Life of an Infectious Disease Doc 1.3
(Via Ruth H.)

(Source: kindlequotes)

Jul 19

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Peter De Vries, born 27 February 1910, died 28 September 1993
Five Quotes
I write when I’m inspired, and I see to it that I’m inspired at nine o’clock every morning.
I love being a writer. What I can’t stand is the paperwork.
We must love one another, yes, yes, that’s all true enough, but nothing says we have to like each other.
Words fashioned with somewhat over precise diction are like shapes turned out by a cookie cutter.
The satirist shoots to kill while the humorist brings his prey back alive and eventually releases him again for another chance.
De Vries was an American editor and novelist, who worked for The New Yorker magazine from 1944 to 1987. De Vries wrote short stories, reviews, poetry, essays, a play, novellas, and 23 novels.  
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Peter De Vries, born 27 February 1910, died 28 September 1993

Five Quotes

  1. I write when I’m inspired, and I see to it that I’m inspired at nine o’clock every morning.
  2. I love being a writer. What I can’t stand is the paperwork.
  3. We must love one another, yes, yes, that’s all true enough, but nothing says we have to like each other.
  4. Words fashioned with somewhat over precise diction are like shapes turned out by a cookie cutter.
  5. The satirist shoots to kill while the humorist brings his prey back alive and eventually releases him again for another chance.

De Vries was an American editor and novelist, who worked for The New Yorker magazine from 1944 to 1987. De Vries wrote short stories, reviews, poetry, essays, a play, novellas, and 23 novels.  

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

Jul 18

truthstream:

Which one sounds healthier to you?

truthstream:

Which one sounds healthier to you?

(via antinwo)

Jul 17

“Major industries are devoted to the task: public relations, advertising, marketing generally, all of which add up to a very large component of the Gross Domestic Product. They are dedicated to what the great political economist Thorstein Veblen called “fabricating wants.” In the words of business leaders themselves, the task is to direct people to “the superficial things” of life, like “fashionable consumption.” That way people can be atomized, separated from one another, seeking personal gain alone, diverted from dangerous efforts to think for themselves and challenge authority.” — Noam Chomsky

(Source: noam-chomsky)

Jul 16

[video]

Jul 15

How to write an irresistible book blurb in five easy steps -

amandaonwriting:

Your blurb will be an important part of your marketing. It is vital to get a reader’s attention. To write a good blurb, you have to make it short. Cut out sub-plots. Add tension to make it dramatic. Try not to mention more than two character’s names, and promise your audience a read they won’t forget.

I’ve come up with this easy acronym to help you create a blurb. I call it SCOPE. Follow these five steps and see if it works for you.

Setting
Conflict
Objective
Possible Solution
Emotional Promise

  1. Setting: All stories involve characters who are in a certain setting at a certain time. 
  2. Conflict: A good story places these characters in a situation where they have to act or react. A good way to start this part of your blurb is with the words: But, However, Until
  3. Objective: What do your characters need to do?
  4. Possible Solution: Offer the reader hope here. Show them how the protagonist can overcome. Give them a reason to pick up the book. Use the word ‘If’ here.
  5. Emotional Promise: Tell them how the book will make them feel. This sets the mood for your reader.

I saw The Edge of Tomorrow today, and I decided to write a blurb using this formula.

Example

  1. London. The near future. Aliens have invaded Earth and colonised Europe. Major William Cage is a PR expert for the US Army, which is working with the British to prevent the invaders from crossing the English Channel. Battle after battle is lost until an unexpected victory gives humanity hope.
  2. But the enemy is invincible. A planned push into Europe fails and Cage finds himself in a war he has no way to fight, and he is killed. However, he wakes up, rebooted back a day every time he dies.
  3. He lives through hellish day after day, until he finds another soldier, Sergeant Rita Vrataski, who understands what he can do to fight the enemy. Cage and Vrataski have to take the fight to the aliens, learning more after each repeated encounter.
  4. If they succeed, they will destroy the enemy, and save Earth.
  5. This thrilling action-packed science fiction war story will show you how heroes are made and wars can be won. Against the odds.

SCOPE will work for any blurb. Why don’t you try it?

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

© Amanda Patterson

If you enjoyed this article, you may enjoy How to write a query letter in 12 easy steps and How to write a one-page synopsis

“Living in poverty is like being punched in the face over and over and over on a daily basis. It’s pulling yourself out of a hole, only to fall over a cliff. Every step in the right direction is rewarded with a hearty push several steps back. The changes to one’s mental health when living in poverty can be astonishing.” — Poor as Folk

(via azspot)

Jul 14

Unlikely simultaneous historical events

jkottke:

A poster on Reddit asks: What are two events that took place in the same time in history but don’t seem like they would have? A few of my favorite answers (from this thread and a previous one):

When pilgrims were landing on Plymouth Rock, you could already visit what is now Santa Fe, New Mexico to stay at a hotel, eat at a restaurant and buy Native American silver.

Prisoners began to arrive to Auschwitz a few days after McDonald’s was founded.

The first wagon train of the Oregon Trail heads out the same year the fax machine is invented.

Nintendo was founded in 1888. Jack the Ripper was on the loose in 1888.

1912 saw the maiden voyage of the Titanic as well as the birth of vitamins, x-ray crystallography, and MDMA.

1971: The year in which America drove a lunar buggy on the moon and Switzerland gave women the vote.

NASA’s Gemini program was winding down at the same time as plate tectonics, as we know it today, was becoming refined and accepted by the scientific community.

Spain was still a fascist dictatorship when Microsoft was founded.

There were no classes in calculus in Harvard’s curriculum for the first few years because calculus hadn’t been discovered yet.

Two empires [Roman & Ottoman] spanned the entire gap from Jesus to Babe Ruth.

When the pyramids were being built, there were still woolly mammoths.

The last use of the guillotine was in France the same year Star Wars came out.

Oxford University was over 300 years old when the Aztec Empire was founded.

Related: true facts that sound made up, timeline twins, and the Great Span.

Jul 13

“Talent isn’t enough, she had told us. Writing is work. Anyone can do this, anyone can learn to do this. It’s not rocket science, it’s habits of mind and habits of work. I started with people much more talented than me, she said, and they’re dead or in jail or not writing. The difference between myself and them is that I’m writing.” —

Alexander Chee reminisces about studying with literary sage Annie Dillard

The above insight reflects the psychology of the mindset essential for achievement in any field and echoes Susan Sontag’s thoughts on being a writer.

(Source: explore-blog)

Jul 12

As she jumps over moving platforms, blows up barrels at the right time, collects glowing gems, looks for treasure chests, scores a head-shot, storms an alien base, perfects her racing line, upgrades her weapons, allots a perfect square of land, gets an extra life, recruits a companion, seizes mineable resources, invests in a new infrastructure… my fellow player may realize that all of her actions pertain to a specific mode of thinking and acting.

If computer games, in their immense variety, have anything in common, that may be their compulsion for efficiency and control. Computer games are the aesthetic form of rationalization.

” —

Video Games and the Spirit of Capitalism

Counter with video games and the spirit of altruism

(Source: explore-blog)

Jul 11

A New Tool That Seals Bullet Wounds in Seconds With High-Tech Sponges | Wired Design | Wired.com

wildcat2030:

See on Scoop.it - The future of medicine and health
image
The XStat syringe, filled with scientifically advanced sponges, can plug a life-threatening bullet wound in a matter of seconds.

Caught in a fire fight, a soldier might hope for air support rained down from a Predator Drone, a kitted out AR-15 assault rifle, and soon, a tube full of high-tech cotton balls. The last item on the list might seem out of place, but the XStat syringe, filled with scientifically advanced sponges, can plug a life-threatening bullet wound in a matter of seconds.

Tourniquets are useful tools for injuries to extremities, but gushing wounds in the pelvis or shoulder require a different approach. The current standard of care is stuffing gauze into the wound. Not only is gauze not FDA cleared for this application, it’s often painful, imprecise, and ineffective, requiring field medics to repeat the agonizing process.

A company called RevMedx decided to approach the problem in a different manner after being inspired by expanding foams used to patch tires and walls. Realizing that foams wouldn’t be effective, they cut up ordinary sink sponges and stuffed them into wounded pigs. Their makeshift “medical device” worked, and a $5 million development contract from the U.S. Army followed shortly thereafter.


See on wired.com